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This is the Police National Dyslexia Association's logo, which has the crest logo of the association alongside the name.

What is Asperger’s?

Asperger syndrome refers to a form of autism with mild or no impairment in the individual’s capacity to use language. Asperger syndrome is no longer a separate diagnosis as it is now considered part of the autism spectrum, however the term is still in common use.

Many people who fit the profile for Asperger syndrome are now being diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder instead. Each person is different, and it is up to each individual how they choose to identify. Some people with a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome may choose to keeping using the term, while others may prefer to refer to themselves as autistic or on the autistic spectrum. 

Autism is a spectrum condition. All autistic people share certain difficulties, but being autistic will affect them in different ways. Some people with Asperger syndrome also have mental health issues or other conditions, meaning people need different levels and types of support. People with Asperger syndrome see, hear and feel the world differently to other people. If you have Asperger syndrome, you have it for life – it is not an illness or disease and cannot be ‘cured’. Often people feel that Asperger syndrome is a fundamental aspect of their identity. 

People with Asperger syndrome don’t have the learning disabilities that many autistic people have, but they may have specific learning difficulties. They may have fewer problems with speech but may still have difficulties with understanding and processing language.

With the right sort of support, all autistic people can be helped to live a more fulfilling life of their own choosing.

Do I need a Diagnosis?

The characteristics of Asperger syndrome vary from one person to another, although there are some key traits that autistic people share. These are:  

  • persistent difficulties with or differences in social communication and social interaction 
  • restricted and repetitive patterns of behaviours, activities or interests since early childhood, to the extent that these impact negatively on day to day life.

The diagnosis process usually involves a multi-disciplinary diagnostic team – often including a speech and language therapist, paediatrician, psychiatrist and/or psychologist.

Because Asperger syndrome varies widely from person to person, making a diagnosis can be difficult. It is often diagnosed later in children than autism and sometimes symptoms may not be recognised and diagnosed until adulthood.

Asperger syndrome (autism.org.uk)

https://www.npaa.org.uk/

 

Does this sound like you?

We would always recommend seeking further assistance, guidance, and a diagnosis from your GP.